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Explain Market Research launches new research solution to deliver innovation

Originally developed in 2010, Explain’s innovative online community platform has undergone a substantial upgrade to better meet the needs of clients and end users.

Organisations in a range of sectors, including utilities, healthcare and manufacturing, have chosen our platform as it provides a unique and extremely cost-effective method of research and engagement to suit any budget.

An online community in the simplest form is a form of social and digital engagement, sometimes referred to as an online panel; they offer a bespoke, members-only digital space in which to directly engage ‘in the moment’ with a desired audience – for example, customers, stakeholders, or internal staff. Communities are currently being used to monitor perceptions of customer service, develop new products, and engage with vulnerable and ‘hard to reach’ consumer groups.

Along with the build of each community, Explain provide an ongoing management and moderation service which sees users encouraged to actively participate in conversation, providing a qualitative two way conversation. Views and opinions are gathered through discussion threads, polls and online surveys, with fresh and relevant content uploaded frequently to ensure high levels of engagement, providing a 360 degree view from customers.

Our online communities range in scale and scope, with each community individually designed to deliver the needs of clients. We currently host and manage online communities ranging from bespoke projects with 50 members, running for a limited time to deliver immediate insights, to long term strategic models with thousands of members, that will run over a number of years as an engagement tool.

The recently launched Version 3 of the platform offers enhanced design and media capabilities, along with greater usability to improve user experience for members.

Kim Davis, Explain Market Research’s Managing Director commented “Our newest release has stimulated interest from those who see research as an ongoing investment in product and service refinement. Any industry that is serious about stakeholder engagement should consider an online community, as an extremely cost-effective way to carry out ongoing research.  It breaks down barriers such as location, accessibility and timing. We are seeing a significant shift towards this type of research, particularly in regulatory environments, to demonstrate consistent engagement, and also in manufacturing for product innovation and development.”

Based in Newcastle upon Tyne, Explain has provided full-service market research solutions to a range of organisations for over two decades, with specialist knowledge and expertise in the utilities, healthcare and financial services sectors. Delivering innovative insights is at the forefront of our culture. Our online communities are part of a wider suite of innovative solutions to research and engagement, which also includes mobile app surveys, collecting ‘in the moment’ data and insights.

With a shift towards ongoing and digital research, to demonstrate consistent engagement, we continue to work with clients to find solutions to their needs, and are seeing a significant increase in the uptake of online communities as a research tool.

Take a look at our infographic below and get in touch to understand how your organisation will benefit from an online community.

communities infographic


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A guide to market research – DIY or outsource to a specialist agency?

Company budgets are always under review and managers are always under pressure to make savings, so when it comes to market research is this something that can be carried out by your own internal resource, or do you need a market research agency that specialises in this discipline to deliver this for you?

There are times when research does lend itself to being carried out externally and times when this can be carried out well internally. However, organisations do have to be careful that in their efforts to save money, it doesn’t cost the business money in the long run! Poorly constructed research can also have an impact on the public’s perception of your business, as research is another form of engagement and will leave a lasting impression on your customers and stakeholders.

Before deciding which way to go, there are a number of important factors which should be considered:

  1. In-house capability

You may not think it takes a genius to construct a survey, however experience alongside strategic and logical thinking are required in order to get the most from any research. A strategic mindset will help establish what you are trying to achieve from your survey, while logic is needed to map out the questionnaire journey, question type and determine if the outputs will meet your objectives. This may sound obvious, however it’s amazing how many surveys end up going out the door, yet the results don’t meet the initial research objectives!

A quick short online survey for example can usually be constructed by someone internally and is generally more cost effective to do so, using the various tools that are available across the internet. However, for more complex work which has high importance for your business, think carefully before using anyone who hasn’t got the experience to do this.

  1. In-house resource

If you require a methodology that involves 1,100 completed on-street or telephone surveys then carrying this out internally usually isn’t an option! This is obvious to outsource due to the number of fieldworkers that would be required and the technical capability required for telephone interviewing, such as call recording.

There are methodologies that in theory could be delivered by an internal team, such as focus groups. However it is vital that the team is proficient in focus group moderation, discussion guide creation and thematic analysis. There should also be enough moderators to handle a number of groups to be representative of the base that you are researching.

The administration and organisation of a focus group should not be overlooked.  As part of a package that a research agency offers, the administration and logistics of recruitment and session organisation are also included – this is time consuming and well thought through in terms of ideal venues, room sizes, location, equipment and so forth.  Therefore if your organisation does not have the resource to do this, then this is also an added value benefit.

  1. Market Research Society (MRS) guidelines

Most research agencies are MRS partners or members and will adhere to the guidelines set out by the MRS. These are professional standards which are put in place to ensure that research is delivered to the highest standard in terms of ethical practices, commercial value and reliability.

Research agencies often send their staff on Market Research Society courses to enhance their professional development, so that they bring more to their clients in terms of innovation and best practice.

  1. Independent research

When outsourcing to a research agency, bias is less of a concern than it would be if it was carried out by an internal team or person. Research by a third party will be carried out and delivered independently, which will impact on respondents’ openness to questions during fieldwork.

Concern of a biased approach to analysis and delivery of results is also removed when outsourcing to a specialist agency, as there is no danger of political agenda or emotional attachment to the outputs.

  1. Quality and reliability

Depending on resource available and the capability of staff within the organisation, quality and reliability of findings should be considered. You may have a team of highly trained and experienced market research specialists, however if you don’t these factors may be at risk. The importance and influence of the outputs and complexity of the research will provide a good indication as to whether your project should be outsourced to an agency who can guarantee high quality work and robust results.

Consider your options carefully, weigh up the risks and if you believe research is worth doing – it’s worth doing correctly.

Contact us today to find out more about the research and engagement solutions we offer at Explain.

diy-or-outsource-infographic-v2

 


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Engaging with the vulnerable and hard to reach

Vulnerable customer and ‘hard to reach’ research is a requirement that more and more insight and market research managers are having to address as part of their roles. Not only are regulators keen for organisations to demonstrate that they are inclusive, but there is huge value in businesses being more effective in their engagement with those who are in debt or utilising services inefficiently.

Vulnerable customers are often identified as those with long or short term illness, those living with disabilities or in poverty, and also customers who are elderly.

Hard to reach groups will differ depending on the organisation and the products and services which are offered, but can include:

  1. Non-English speakers
  2. Those who are in severe debt
  3. Those who have suffered a mental illness or struggle socially
  4. Individuals who have a drug or alcohol addiction
  5. Younger people who are not in education or employment
  6. Elderly who live alone and don’t have family or friends

There are many reasons why it is important for organisations to be able to reach out to audiences that can be more difficult to engage with. This can be from a socially responsible point of view, or to reduce inefficiencies. However, as the term suggests – ‘hard to reach’ is exactly that, so having the right approach is vital.

So how can an organisation grow relationships with those where there are perhaps more barriers in place that will allow them to do this?

As organisations are placing more importance on engaging with these audiences we have become experts in delivering research programmes that provide great insight into these key groups.

As every organisation is different and each of these groups are so very diverse, a one size fits all approach will not work in research. Careful thought and consideration as to how these groups can be engaged with is crucial. Below are just three important factors which need to be deliberated when putting in place research and engagement with hard to reach and vulnerable groups:

  1. Language

For example, there is little point in using technical jargon or business speak when engaging with a group of 16 year olds. This may seem obvious, however it is surprising how difficult it is to get a specific point across without making use of industry specific terms. This is very common in the healthcare sector for instance. We recently carried out research which found that although the terms ‘Primary Care’ and ‘Secondary Care’ are commonly used terms across the NHS, only 26% of the sample we spoke to actually understood the term  ‘Primary Care’.  And this isn’t just the hard to reach groups either, this is the general public.

  1. Tone

Tone is different to language, as it goes beyond the actual words used in any communications, whether a discussion guide, questionnaire, online survey or promotional material used to engage for the research. Tone should be adopted for the audience – a formal approach will not encourage those who are young to participate in any research, as this can be intimidating. Having a moderator in place who is able to adapt to the audience is vital. For questionnaires, more visuals can be used. There are lots of creative ways in which you can communicate with your respondents, to make them feel at ease and more willing to open up and participate.

  1. Methodology and Selection

Usually a methodology is largely selected on the type of insight that is required, however carrying out telephone interviews or on-street surveys as you require a quantitative analysis will gain little return with a disengaged group, while trying to recruit on-street to get people who have issues socially to come along to a focus group at a public space such as a hotel will not be successful either.  Methods such attending pre-arranged groups or community sessions are an extremely useful way to engage with the hard to reach. Not only are you going to them, they are also in their own environment so will feel naturally more comfortable and more willing to participate. Offering experiences is also a fantastic way to encourage some hard to reach groups to participate in research. Activity days that will provide them with some value and an enjoyable experience will not only encourage them as respondents to attend, but also will make individuals feel more at ease and start to participate more with a skilled moderator. Online communities which already have a specific audience type are a great way to engage with those certain groups. There are online communities available which specialise in certain profile types; for example, an online community made up of people who have a disability, or who care for those who do, is an excellent way to carry out a range of qualitative or quantitative research.

Our team at Explain Market Research are experts at putting in place research programmes with vulnerable customers and those who are hard to reach.

Contact us today to find out more.

vulnerable-and-hard-to-reach-infographic

 


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The power of social media in research

Read our article to find out how social media can be used as part of a robust research programme:

On the 15th of February Research Live reported that the global social media analytics market is set to grow by 27.6% due to new advanced analytic techniques and a surge of users. This is unsurprising given the power of social media and the volumes of unanticipated feedback customers provide on channels like Facebook and Twitter every day.

For example, last year in their social media report McCallum Layton reported that around half of social media users are likely to share positive or negative experiences of a brand on social media and so the power of social media for research purposes cannot be ignored. Customers are increasingly vocal and giving organisations ‘free’ and unprompted feedback every day on what they love and hate about your brand, service or product. If you can harness this feedback then you can gain insights to help shape the direction of your activities.

Social media listening should not be conducted in isolation (self-selection bias is at the extreme here with only the happiest and unhappiest customers likely to speak up), however as part of a robust research programme it can add an additional dimension to the knowledge base of your business. Further information on the benefits and drawbacks of social media listening can be found in our infographic: https://goo.gl/i5jTgk

You can even go one step further and ring fence the power of social media into your very own online community where your customers can interact with each other and you to drive business improvement. Communities can be long term with 5,000 plus members or short term with 100 members, either way providing you with plentiful actionable insights to help you make the right choices.

To learn more about how we build, moderate and manage online communities for our range of clients, get in touch!


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Using social media for market research

As a research agency, we are often asked how social media can be used as a tool for market research.

Social media is an excellent resource to tap into to gain insight for organisations, however there are data protection guidelines that need to be considered.

We have produced an infographic as a guide to help anyone who is considering utilising social media as a research tool.

social media research


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The fair exchange

The utopian concept of a seamless collaboration between creators and consumers is considered by many companies to be beyond their reach.

This is largely because the process of gaining the credible insights that are needed in order to develop the strongest iteration of a product or service is daunting. However, recent studies have revealed that consumers are more willing than ever to collaborate with a brand and, crucially, they’re in a better position to do so than ever before.

Research company Insites Consulting recently published data to demonstrate the status of the social media landscape. In it, they conclude “80-90% of consumers want to be involved in co-creation”. The only thing they ask in return is to be told how their feedback has been used.

In our view, the purpose of market research is to create the ‘actionable insights’ that are derived from gathering useful information and spending time, effort and money discerning what customers want.
However, despite the best intentions of business owners, there has long been an invisible barrier between ‘seller’ and ‘purchaser’ making it difficult to retrieve reliable results. Finding the right people, asking the right questions and motivating those involved have typically stood in the way.

Today, it is so much easier for consumers to communicate directly with brands. Indeed, according to the Insites report “1.5 billion people use social media sites… 51% of Internet users have a smartphone and most have data stored on it”. Given all this, it seems that there is a huge opportunity for organic interactions between creators and consumers. All we need to do is identify how these conversations can be facilitated and translated into more collaborative relationships, for example through online communities.

Online communities present the perfect platform for co-creation by providing a private online space through which a company can constantly engage in real-time monitoring of brand opinions and perceptions. The technology also allows a two-way conversation between customer and brand to become a vital component for ensuring all products and services are shaped around the consumers’ needs.
The saying goes that the ‘customer is always right’ but now they are always right there.

Your customers want more from you and their ability to tell you that is right at their fingertips. They want better products and services and they’re ready to tell you just what that means to them.

Or at least, you should hope they are, because they might hold the key to your future success.
For the full report, please click here.